U.S. Highway 89: Scenic Route to Seven National Parks – Page 2

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U.S. Highway 89 Gallery

Page Two

Afton, Wyoming Antler Arch

Afton, Wyoming used more than 3,000 antlers to create its landmark elk antler arch (opposite, top) in 1958. It weighs over 15 tons and spans 75 feet across the entire Highway 89.

Bull Elk Wyoming

Bull elk shed their antlers in early spring, before leaving the winter feeding grounds at the National Elk Refuge, outside Jackson, Wyoming.

Oxbow of the Snake River

Oxbow of the Snake River: Grand Teton National Park

Old Faithful

In 2006, over 15 million people visited the seven national parks served by Highway 89. Yellowstone National Park alone attracted 3 million people, with about 85 percent visiting the Old Faithful area. The crowds peak on summer holidays, and can reach 25,000 people per day.

Jammers Touring Coaches

During the Depression, the White Motor Company built 500 touring coaches for use in the national parks, including the Grand Circle of Zion, Bryce Canyon and the Grand Canyon, as well as Yellowstone and Glacier national parks. After 60 years in service, Glacier’s original fleet of red buses was reconditioned by Ford Motor Company and converted to run on clean-burning propane fuel. In Glacier, the driver/guides were known as “Jammers” for their noisy, gear-jamming driving techniques while summiting the Going-to-the-Sun Road.

Grain Elevator Montana

Grain Elevator in Wilsall, Montana

Beneath Rainbow Dam

Beneath Rainbow Dam, the falls drop 47 feet on the Missouri River. A partnership of government agencies, private enterprises and citizen volunteers in Great Falls has built 30 miles of pedestrian and biking trails linking the dams on the Missouri River.

Ear Mountain

Beneath Rainbow Dam, the falls drop 47 feet on the Missouri River. A partnership of government agencies, private enterprises and citizen volunteers in Great Falls has built 30 miles of pedestrian and biking trails linking the dams on the Missouri River.

 

Blackfeet Reservation

In 1964 catastrophic dam failures killed 30 people on the Blackfeet reservation, displaced hundreds and inundated Highway 89. Sculptor Jay Laber’s family left the Blackfeet reservation. He returned as an artist, turning scrap metal from cars destroyed in the flood into these sentries placed at the northern boundary of the reservation on Highway 89. The sentries face eastward across the prairie to greet the rising sun.

Ann TorrenceAnn Torrence is a writer and photographer based in Salt Lake City. Visit her website, AnnTorrence.com.

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